Dating techniques in archaeology and paleoanthropology

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For all of recorded history, people have looked more or less the same: two eyes, two ears, a nose, a mouth, a head sitting atop an oblong body with two arms and legs.Hairdos differed, but the basic body plan stayed the same for as far back as the history books go. They would be much better at climbing trees, though.These interruptions of the natural cycles and resources have caused detrimental consequences.Now the inhabitants of the planet are relying on expertly trained earth scientists to discover solutions to these problems and effective methods to repair the existing damage already causing environmental hazards.Chronological dating, or simply dating, is the process of attributing to an object or event a date in the past, allowing such object or event to be located in a previously established chronology.This usually requires what is commonly known as a "dating method".This also works with stone tools which are found abundantly at different sites and across long periods of time.

dating techniques in archaeology and paleoanthropology-57

Thus, 1587 is the post quem dating of Shakespeare's play Henry V.

But if you were to go back further in time, a couple million years before anybody figured out how to write, your ancestors would still have two eyes, two ears, a nose, a mouth, a head sitting atop an oblong body with two arms and legs. If you went further back in time, the arms would be front legs.

Even further back in time, the fur would be scales.

This principle presumes that the oldest layer of a stratigraphic sequence will be on the bottom and the most recent, or youngest, will be on the top.

The earliest-known hominids in East Africa are often found in very specific stratigraphic contexts that have implications for their relative dating.

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